cashmere
Beetheh jeghe in dastjerdi yazd

cashmere weaving is an art that established by Zoroastrians and used to sew traditional and religious trousers and garments. especially they used it as a shawl in their celebrations.Termeh is known for its “Bote Jeghe”, which has a narrative. “Bote Jeghe” come from curved sedar Which is rooted in the genuine Iranian-Zoroastrian culture. The story is that Zoroaster, the Prophet of Persia, planted this heaven tree in front of a fire temple, and since then this curved sedar has been used as a symbol and sacred pattern in the most exquisite fabric that was named terme. Old cashmeres, which were woven from wool, were original termeh and because of their hand mading, oldness and their identification, represented as an antique item. Cashmere were woven in different types like as pearls and different kinds of shawls.  The most commonly used patterns in them are Bote jeghe, deer horn, trees and violets.Today, silk cashmere is woven in a variety of designs and colors. It is produced in a variety of plants, inscriptions, stripes and panels.this days silk cashmere are used to sew the bridal service including a tablecloth, upholstered, buffet cover, sajad, cushion and traditional pillow, Saucer, sub-phones, sub-grams and sub-glass, jewelry case, book cover, panel. also it is used in men’s clothing, like as coat, vest, athletic trousers, and in women’s clothing like as manto, women’s suits and in all types of bags and shoes.even in curtains and decorations, as well as in decorating kitchenware and even in baby’s room service.

Seriously creepy which is a sign of Iran and Iranians, is a pattern that named “Bote Jeghe” has always been considered in the history of traditional arts, and used in the decoration of all types of crafts. Particularly, textiles, carpets and rugs, clay tiles, shawl, loom, and other materials in many sizes and shapes.it was also a trangam that was made from feather of birds, and put on the hat, and used by valiant and brave people.

This post is also available in: Persian


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